Mencap is pleased to announce that Mairi Martin will take up a newly-created role as Executive Director of Transformation on 1 June 2020.

Mairi is currently Leader of Exceptional Service (Cornerstone Central) at Cornerstone - one of Scotland’s leading charities, which offers care and support for adults, children and young people with a disability.

In this role, Mairi will have overall responsibility for the organisation’s transformation agenda. This will include the development, delivery, evaluation and alignment of a transformational strategy for Mencap.

In her seven years at Cornerstone, Mairi was responsible for varied business support functions with particular expertise in HR, strategy, and technology. Mairi led Cornerstone’s ambitious transformational change programme, overseeing the development and delivery of the Local Cornerstone Strategy. She also spearheaded the implementation of new technology to deliver increased effectiveness.

Providing training and consultancy to other UK organisations on transformation change, Mairi is an influencer of change in the health and social care sector and regularly supports and speaks at events involving Healthcare Improvement Scotland, the Scottish Government and NHS. She was responsible for setting up and chairing the Evaluation Working Group, comprised of the Scottish Government, Care Inspectorate, Scottish Social Services Council, Healthcare Improvement Scotland and University of Strathclyde. Mairi was also previously Executive Director of Resources of the Riverside Group, a housing and care services organisation, for 13 years.

Commenting on her appointment at the learning disability charity Mencap, Mairi Martin said:

“I am thrilled to be joining Mencap, having been hugely impressed by their work to drive change for the better for people with a learning disability. As someone who thrives on being part of a great team that transforms organisations, I am excited to have the opportunity to build on that with Mencap and look forward to getting started.”

Edel Harris, Chief Executive of the learning disability charity Mencap, said:

I am so pleased to welcome Mairi to Mencap.  Mairi brings a wealth of experience having worked in the social care and housing sectors in both England and Scotland.  She has been involved in introducing an innovative new model of social care, from design of strategy through to successful implementation, and I look forward to her joining Mencap and helping to lead the work we are doing to improve the lives of the 1.5 million people with a learning disability in the UK”. 

-ENDS-

For further information, contact Mencap’s media team on: media@mencap.org.uk or 020 7696 5414 (including out of hours).   

For advice and information on learning disability, including advice on coronavirus and healthcare, please contactMencap’s Freephone Learning Disability Helpline on 0808 808 1111 (9am-3pm, Monday-Friday) or email helpline@mencap.org.uk. Or visit Mencap’s website: www.mencap.org.uk.

Notes to editors 

About Mencap     

There is approximately 1.5 million people with a learning disability in the UK. Mencap works to support people with a learning disability, their families and carers by fighting to change laws, improve services and access to education, employment and leisure facilities.

Mencap supports thousands of people with a learning disability to live their lives the way they want and also campaigns to change laws, improve services and challenge negative attitudes towards people with a learning disability.

What is a learning disability?    

  • A learning disability is a reduced intellectual ability which can cause problems with everyday tasks – for example shopping and cooking, or travelling to new places – which affects someone for their whole life;    
  • Learning disability is NOT a mental illness or a learning difficulty, such as dyslexia. Very often the term ‘learning difficulty’ is wrongly used interchangeably with ‘learning disability’;     
  • People with a learning disability can take longer to learn new things and may need support to develop new skills, understand difficult information and engage with other people. The level of support someone needs is different with every individual. For example, someone with a severe learning disability might need much more support with daily tasks than someone with a mild learning disability.