What is Attendance Allowance?

The front cover of a benefits leaflet which says Attendance Allowance

Attendance Allowance is the name of a benefit that some people can get if they need someone to help them because of their disability.  

A man is giving a man in a wheelchair a cup of tea

The money is to help to pay for your care and support.    

A woman in a house waving next to a green tick and a picture of an Attendance Allowance leaflet

You can claim Attendance Allowance even if you do not have a paid carer.     

Can I get Attendance Allowance?

You can get Attendance Allowance if you: 

  • live in the UK  
  • have lived in Scotland, England or Wales for at least 2 of the past 3 years  
  • are state pension age or older  
  • have a disability (this includes a learning disability )
  • need someone to help you  
  • have needed someone to help you for at least 6 months.  

You can not get Attendance Allowance if you get:  

A group of support workers taking two women in wheelchairs out for the day along the sea front

If you live in a care home and your local authority pays for your care, you do not usually get Attendance Allowance.

If you live in a care home and pay all your care home costs, you can claim Attendance Allowance.

If a medical professional has said that you might have less than 12 months to live, you might be able to claim Attendance Allowance under ‘special rules’.

You can read the full eligibility criteria for Attendance Allowance on the Government’s website

What checks are needed to get Attendance Allowance?

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) will need to check how your disability or health condition affects the amount of help or support you need.

If they are not sure how your disability or health condition affects you from the information on your application form , they might ask you to go for an assessment . If you need an assessment they will send you a letter with the details about your assessment.

Attendance Allowance is not means-tested. The amount of money you earn or have in savings will not affect what you get. 

Two people at a desk in an office. One person is writing things down and the other is talking to them from behind the desk.

How much is Attendance Allowance?

There are 2 different rates of Attendance Allowance.

You will be paid the lower rate if you need a lot of help or looking after during the day, or if you need looking after at night.

You will be paid the higher rate if you need help or looking after during the day and night, or if a medical professional has said you might have less than 12 months to live.

From April 2024 - March 2025, the payments are:

  • £72.65 per week for the lower rate
  • £108.55 per week for the higher rate.

If you get Constant Attendance Allowance, your Attendance Allowance will be reduced by the amount of Constant Attendance Allowance you get. 

How to apply for Attendance Allowance

It's easy to apply for Attendance Allowance.

To find out how to apply for Attendance Allowance, we have created a straightforward step-by-step digital guide to take you through the application process. 

Find out more
Questions and answers about Attendance Allowance

To get Attendance Allowance you must:

  • live in the UK  
  • have lived in Scotland, England or Wales for at least 2 of the past 3 years  
  • be state pension age or older  
  • have a disability (this includes a learning disability)  
  • need someone to help you  
  • have needed someone to help you for at least 6 months.  

You can not claim Attendance Allowance if you get:  

If you live in a care home and your local authority pays for your care, you do not usually get Attendance Allowance.  If you live in a care home and pay all your care home costs, you can claim Attendance Allowance.

If a medical professional has said that you might have less than 12 months to live, you might be able to claim Attendance Allowance under ‘special rules’.

You cannot get Attendance Allowance if you get Disability Living Allowance (DLA).

You cannot get Attendance Allowance if you get Personal Independence Payment (PIP). 

If you get Constant Attendance Allowance and Attendance Allowance, your Attendance Allowance will be reduced by the amount of Constant Attendance Allowance you get.

If you live in a care home and your local authority pays for your care, you do not usually get Attendance Allowance.  If you live in a care home and pay all your care home costs, you can claim Attendance Allowance if you meet all of the other eligibility criteria.

Yes, you do not need to have a carer to claim Attendance Allowance. 

The information on this page is for  guidance  only. Mencap hold no responsibility for DWP processes, timescales, decisions, and service.