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A doctor said I'd be a vegetable

27 August 2015
Amy Clarke

This blog is about how I, a person with a learning disability, lived with my family and how being a member with a learning disability affected me.

To be honest, guys, I can’t remember being born, who can? I was told by my family I was very ill and was born in Germany as my parents were acting on TV and working in the theatre.

I was told that a doctor said I'd be a vegetable, well if I am a vegetable, I am a chilli pepper!

I was told about this doctor years later and thought "Oh my, he predicted wrong" because I lead an independent life, whether I am working, socialising or in my flat. Vegetable no, independent yes! 

Anyway back to my memories, I remember from my early years, living with my Nan who annoyed everyone except me. I then moved to Hackney with my parents near a special school. I didn’t like the school as it stopped me playing. I actually had to read and write and do sums at this place – that was dull.

I moved again to Stoke Newington but I still went to the school and eventually had a friend  who tended to eat everything offered to him, come to think of it so did I.

Well it was great living there and I moved to a mainstream school, which was local and where I was the only person with a disability. I hung out with my school friends who were more confident than me. We went to each other’s parties and listened to Pink Floyd’s no 1 hit “Another brick in the wall”, which had just come out. As for the lessons, I can’t really remember doing them.

My brother was born in this time and I wanted him to speak by the age of 1; that didn’t happen. When he did speak, I didn’t pay attention – I was too busy liking Abba.

I had to move from London to Warrington, which was exciting for me. My dad had a new job as a teacher at a college and had a house included. I went to another school – another mainstream one with a learning assistant. To be honest it wasn’t a great experience after all, as my parents got divorced and changes happened, like my mum leaving home and my dad moving his partner in with her children.

I was so rude to everyone as I was an angry teenager, including my Nan, who was actually nice and took me to see the theatre shows like Cats.

The year after that, I went to a boarding school in the Wirral, to help me with my schooling and to meet people. My school wasn’t a traditional boarding school as it also had blokes in it. I liked it and hated it at the same time, as I discovered the pupils could be nasty. They called me names and ordered me to do things that I didn’t like, such as give them my sweets.I have got to say, looking back there were some good and bad times. If I could speak to the 18-year-old version of me, I would say, 

Enjoy yourself a bit more as a teen – it will get better! You will also get a good sense of humour, that’s essential for all!

Well I’ve got to go, nice blogging to you all!

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